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Author Topic: UK ATC Listening Ban: Support Repeal Proposal  (Read 18876 times)

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AirNav Development

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UK ATC Listening Ban: Support Repeal Proposal
« on: July 06, 2010, 11:35:12 AM »
As on airliners.net forum:

Hello everyone,

The new UK government has launched a web site called Your Freedom to invite proposals of old UK laws which should be repealed. It may come as a surprise to some enthusiasts but it is against the law to discuss, rebroadcast or even listen to ATC communication within the UK. Amazingly, it is not illegal to own an airband radio, but you can't actually listen to anything on it ! This was passed as law under the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1949, and clearly needs to be repealed.

Apart from the obvious lack of harm and security issues associated with airband listening, it provides vital training for pilots, and many other beneficial purposes. With huge numbers of countries' ATC now listenable via the Web, the UK remains one of the few countries (maybe the only country) where law forbids it. This needs to change. I know enthusiasts around the world who listen to ATC online are frustrated by the inability to listen to UK airport, radar and sector communication, and this is the first OFFICIAL chance to have your say and get the law repealed.

Please visit the link below, RATE IT and if you have supportive COMMENTS, please post them in the box at the bottom of that page. The more ratings and comments, the more likely it will be to get selected and, hopefully, effected. Past petitions have failed, but now the UK government itself wants to know about these archaic laws, and this is DEFINITELY one of them.

For the future of global ATC broadcast streaming to include the UK, and for us Brits to be able to use our scanners without breaking the law (!), please support the proposal I have created at the link below.

Many Thanks,
Paul

http://yourfreedom.hmg.gov.uk/repealing-unnecessary-laws/air-traffic-radio-listening-rebroadcast
« Last Edit: July 06, 2010, 11:44:38 AM by AirNav Development »

DaveReid

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Re: UK ATC Listening Ban: Support Repeal Proposal
« Reply #1 on: July 06, 2010, 11:39:24 AM »
please support the proposal I have created at the link below.

Many Thanks,
Paul

http://yourfreedom.hmg.gov.uk/repeal...raffic-radio-listening-rebroadcast

That's going to be rather difficult as the link doesn't work ...
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air7677

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« Last Edit: July 06, 2010, 11:45:18 AM by air7677 »

AirNav Development

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Aerotower

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Re: UK ATC Listening Ban: Support Repeal Proposal
« Reply #4 on: July 06, 2010, 02:38:56 PM »
"the UK remains one of the few countries (maybe the only country)"

Many Thanks,
Paul

http://yourfreedom.hmg.gov.uk/repealing-unnecessary-laws/air-traffic-radio-listening-rebroadcast

Is not the only, Portugal is another one of those stupid countries.

DeeJay

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Re: UK ATC Listening Ban: Support Repeal Proposal
« Reply #5 on: July 06, 2010, 04:08:39 PM »
True, it always has been illegal to listen to air traffic,and other such transmissions, but by and large a ''blind eye'' has been turned on behalf of the authorities. Look at all who hang around Heathrow with scanners! The unwritten law is, I believe, not to talk too much to ''outsiders'' about what is overheard, or be tempted to approach the media with any snippets which may have arisen out of listening. I vividly remember the so-called ''Dianagate'' affair of the late eighties or early nineties. That nearly did cause big problems for listeners.

DaveReid

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Re: UK ATC Listening Ban: Support Repeal Proposal
« Reply #6 on: July 06, 2010, 04:26:19 PM »
We Brits are lucky enough to live in a country where laws that are generally regarded as silly, like this one, tend not to be actively enforced.

I can't help thinking that drawing attention to its non-enforcement might not necessarily have the intended effect ...
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Blincodave

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Re: UK ATC Listening Ban: Support Repeal Proposal
« Reply #7 on: July 06, 2010, 04:33:43 PM »
We Brits are lucky enough to live in a country where laws that are generally regarded as silly, like this one, tend not to be actively enforced.

I can't help thinking that drawing attention to its non-enforcement might not necessarily have the intended effect ...

Agreed Dave.

Southwest

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Re: UK ATC Listening Ban: Support Repeal Proposal
« Reply #8 on: July 06, 2010, 05:54:13 PM »
I agree as wll.

If you bring to the attention that this law exists and the motion to scrap it is defeated, it then brings its existance back to the fore and it might cause even bigger problems in the future.

AirNav Development

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Re: UK ATC Listening Ban: Support Repeal Proposal
« Reply #9 on: July 06, 2010, 07:21:53 PM »
We Brits are lucky enough to live in a country where laws that are generally regarded as silly, like this one, tend not to be actively enforced.

I can't help thinking that drawing attention to its non-enforcement might not necessarily have the intended effect ...

Are you allowed to rebroadcast (as an example) Heathrow ATC on the web?
It is my opinion that "silly" laws should simply not exist instead of existing and authorities not looking at them. Anyway that would bring us to a discussion on how laws are interpreted all over the world...
« Last Edit: July 06, 2010, 07:27:43 PM by AirNav Development »

Lou

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Re: UK ATC Listening Ban: Support Repeal Proposal
« Reply #10 on: July 06, 2010, 09:40:04 PM »
i`ve just registered on the site and given them a blast

air7677

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Re: UK ATC Listening Ban: Support Repeal Proposal
« Reply #11 on: July 06, 2010, 09:52:50 PM »
A terrorist  strike could change the law again/ its a dodgy topic.

QF1

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Re: UK ATC Listening Ban: Support Repeal Proposal
« Reply #12 on: July 07, 2010, 02:54:59 AM »

I would love to have LHR, LGW ect re-broadcast as it is a long trip there from "Down Under" and I do miss listening to the London traffic.

I have never really understood those who say that the ban is partly in place to protect against terrorism.  I don't think that the terrorists are ever very observant about following "the laws of the land".  I would imagine it is against the law to let off bombs, but it doesn't seem to stop them and nor would an enforcement of the radio monitoring ban.  It only affects those law-abiding citizens who use their radios to enjoy their hobby.

My 2p worth.

Cheers
Mark

Chris11

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Re: UK ATC Listening Ban: Support Repeal Proposal
« Reply #13 on: July 07, 2010, 06:32:12 AM »
I think a terrorist will have his own ANRB and radio and will rely on those transmissions to do his deed rather than rely on a website

ACW367

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Re: UK ATC Listening Ban: Support Repeal Proposal
« Reply #14 on: July 07, 2010, 08:32:04 AM »
Hahahaha this is getting so funny. Those that say it could be used by terrorists, make me giggle. There is a zero point zero percent linkage between terrorism and recievers. That is like saying we should blanket ban nails or oyster cards because they were used by 7/7 bombers, or white vans as previously used by the IRA.         This law was written because in 1949 there was no pure recieving equipment. Morse keys and early radios could transmit, which can be used maliciously.  There was an issue with organised crime listening to police frequencies, but they are now fully encrypted.  The WTA should retain full licencing and enforcement on transcievers as originally designed, but should remove all reference to multiband receiver equipment.