anything
AirNav RadarBox
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
 


Author Topic: Has anyone tried taking it on a plane?  (Read 5338 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

atcukmatty

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 57
Has anyone tried taking it on a plane?
« on: June 17, 2009, 02:36:17 PM »
im going on holiday and im only bringing hand lugauge. has anyone every tried to do this before. would you be stopped by security?


bailey_uk

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 241
Re: Has anyone tried taking it on a plane?
« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2009, 02:47:00 PM »
Hey there, yes I and many others on here have got through security with RadarBox and antenna in hand luggage with no questions asked at all.

I even loaded my laptop up and had the RB plugged in whilst mid flight which was very interesting. It only picked up the aircraft itself, with no others coming up in My Flights.

Cant wait to take it on again for my trip to Barbados at Christmas.

James
Possibly the youngest RadarBox Owner!

tommyg

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 255
Re: Has anyone tried taking it on a plane?
« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2009, 04:22:10 PM »
Have taken my RB to Portugal and am currently in the USA and have had no problems with security searches so far. Wil be interesting coming back through the  TSA search teams. I use a Totes belt bag with bubblewrap and that works a treat transporting it.
Tommyg

Rural Outpost

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 86
  • Still waiting to pick up a DAN AIR HS748 !
Re: Has anyone tried taking it on a plane?
« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2009, 04:47:52 PM »
I have taken mine in my hand luggage numerous times traveling to Spain. I have it well protected in bubble wrap .....and always have the box to show it is somethng I purchased legally, just incase of any potentially difficult questions.

Regards
Rural Outpost

radarspotter10

  • Guest
Re: Has anyone tried taking it on a plane?
« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2009, 06:19:14 PM »
I have taken mine in my hand luggage numerous times traveling to Spain. I have it well protected in bubble wrap .....and always have the box to show it is somethng I purchased legally, just incase of any potentially difficult questions.

Regards
Rural Outpost

hi all.
was just reading your post about flying very interesting, would the metal in the plane stop it receiving or will you interfere with the planes control, i do not know?.
But i was also reading a thread on another forum, there just talking about the SBS portable and what a set up,  you need a car battery or inverter for 240V or mybe a deep cycle battery off an old invalid buggy, he! he! what a laugh,  thank god for good old airnav, takes power from usb, my battery on laptop last 4 hours and i have second for back up.
from pat

bailey_uk

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 241
Re: Has anyone tried taking it on a plane?
« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2009, 07:14:49 PM »
Wont interfere with any systems as it doesnt transmit, just receives.

The planes structure id guess it definately the reason why no other ADS-B signals were received from elsewhere, however would be interesting to try out again.

The best part of it was seeing our approach into EGCC. As we banked over hard to the right to be on finals, the history line drew a perfect corrosponding green line behind!

Would if been the icing on the cake if we went into the hold! But it was pretty much a direct approach.

James
Possibly the youngest RadarBox Owner!

CoastGuardJon

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1178
  • Mullion Cove, Kernow --- sw Cornwall UK.
Re: Has anyone tried taking it on a plane?
« Reply #6 on: June 17, 2009, 07:45:21 PM »
Wont interfere with any systems as it doesnt transmit, just receives.

4 years ago, on a flight with Monarch to Fuerteventura, the cabin staff got extremey twitchy over the fact I had a hand-held Garmin GPS 12 running.    I explained it was purely passive, the hostess took it to the flight deck, and when she came back with it, said the Captain had agreed it was totally passive and had no possible effects on the aircraft systems, but asked me very nicely to turn it off for the remainder of the flight for security purposes - I complied.    On the return journey, I had it running again, but kept it secreted under the shoulder of my shirt recording complete flight from FUE to EGKK.
ANRB :  AOR AR8000 : Icom R-7000 : Icom IC-R9000 : JRC NRD-545 : OptoElectronics Digital Scout and OptoLinx Interface; Realistic Pro-2005 : UBC 800XLT - listed in alphabetical order, not cost, preference, performance or entertainment value!

bailey_uk

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 241
Re: Has anyone tried taking it on a plane?
« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2009, 07:49:59 PM »
Thats a good point! I had both the RB and aerial still in my rucksack at my feet, with the USB cable coming out and into my laptop, so nothing there to shock the cabin staff!

However on approach to the airfield, the staff do tend to request that no electronic equipement be used, and for the fold up table to be stowed...I just waited untill they had takin their seats for landing and wapped it back out again!
Possibly the youngest RadarBox Owner!

atcukmatty

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 57
Re: Has anyone tried taking it on a plane?
« Reply #8 on: June 30, 2009, 12:35:16 PM »
well im just back from my holiday and got it in my hand lugyage to and from. Its fun, gives you something to do on a plane :p. Sometimes you can see the odd plane on radarbox then you look out the window and see it flying beside you.

dudbaker

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 166
Re: Has anyone tried taking it on a plane?
« Reply #9 on: July 01, 2009, 08:30:23 AM »
Hi
Superhetrodine receivers have a local oscillator.  Effectively a low power transmitter.  The JAA require that all scanners, GPS and SBS type equipment be switch off when below 10000 feet.  The FAA are paranoid.  The kit could, in theory interfere with the Nav equipment.  The transponder and DME use the same frequency but alternate between the two.  The DME and lower transponder antennas are interchangeable.  The upper one was until TCAS/Mode S required a DF antenna.

Dudley.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2009, 07:56:47 AM by dudbaker »
Dudley Baker
Stansted
G8THH
[email protected]
Valiant, Victor, Shackelton, Canberra, VC10, Tornado Typhoon 737 747 A320 A300 Engineer.

bratters

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 935
Re: Has anyone tried taking it on a plane?
« Reply #10 on: July 01, 2009, 08:45:09 AM »
Thats a good point! I had both the RB and aerial still in my rucksack at my feet, with the USB cable coming out and into my laptop, so nothing there to shock the cabin staff!

However on approach to the airfield, the staff do tend to request that no electronic equipement be used, and for the fold up table to be stowed...I just waited untill they had takin their seats for landing and wapped it back out again!

I can't say I agree with the tendency expressed in this thread to ignore or over-ride instructions given by the captain/crew of an aircraft.
 
Whether those instructions are right or wrong - in the opinion of a single passenger - is groundless. They are the instructions of the crew and should be obeyed.

Also any attempt to use electronic equipment in a furtive manner is more than likely to put the willies up any passenger who spot you. If that passenger happens to be an armed guard, you could find yourself in a very tricky situation.

C'mon guys - grow up and act like responsible citizens.

atcukmatty

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 57
Re: Has anyone tried taking it on a plane?
« Reply #11 on: July 01, 2009, 10:56:25 AM »
 it does not transmit only recieves how is it possible to interfere with any equipment!
They have even admitted that electronic equipment has no safety risk on board, plus in the future you will be able recieve and make calls in flight

jgrloit

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 271
Re: Has anyone tried taking it on a plane?
« Reply #12 on: July 01, 2009, 10:59:32 AM »
The system does not transmit, but will radiate a low power signal from the various Oscillators and Intermediate Frequencies within the System.

As another point - The FAA are now permitting mobile Telephones, they radiate/Transmit on frequencies much closer to those used by the navigation systems than normal recievers do, and with more power!!!!
Based in Hexham - Tyne Valley 
Best view for RB is North of a line between EGNT and EGNC  - includes OTA and Spade, to EGPH above 7500ft.   Can be TRUE mobile with Mobile Broadband feed to Network.

bratters

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 935
Re: Has anyone tried taking it on a plane?
« Reply #13 on: July 01, 2009, 11:25:36 AM »
The point is that the captain is in sole charge of his aircraft. We may all have opinions of what's electronically safe but that doesn't cut any ice whatsoever in this situation. Some think they have a right to smoke; some want to get drunk; some want to use phones. So what? Is everybody is free to do his own thing? I think not!

If the crew says it's OK, then fine, go ahead. But if the crew says switch it off, you switch it off. It's that simple and if you choose to ignore crew warnings, then when you get caught, I trust you will get slung off, fined and banned.

There are hundreds of lives at stake and rules, right or wrong, are made for the safety of all.

dudbaker

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 166
Re: Has anyone tried taking it on a plane?
« Reply #14 on: July 06, 2009, 01:01:57 PM »
Hi

Mobile phones check the signal strength form the transmit sight.  Then set the required power.  This is a battery saving feature.  The JAA and presumably the FAA have allow mobile phone operation on aircraft fitted with a pico cell.  Thus much lower power.  The pico cell is connected to a satellite system.

Dudley.
Dudley Baker
Stansted
G8THH
[email protected]
Valiant, Victor, Shackelton, Canberra, VC10, Tornado Typhoon 737 747 A320 A300 Engineer.