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Author Topic: Search and Rescue Helicopter positions  (Read 33005 times)

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tarbat

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Search and Rescue Helicopter positions
« on: January 31, 2009, 11:04:07 AM »
Living by the sea as I do, I have a keen interest in Search and Rescue helicopters.  These don't have ADS/B equipment, so never plot on the map, but do appear in the list.

A useful tool in being able to track the postion of these helicopters is ShipPlotter.  These helicopters have AIS transmitters fitted, so plot their postions in ShipPlotter - see screenshot.

Canonjohns40D

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Re: Search and Rescue Helicopter positions
« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2009, 11:13:20 AM »
Cheers Tarbat I am a keen Air Sea Rescue fan also so this is a very useful tip indeed. Cheers John
Hi I'm John... and I'm a Radarbox User. I'm based in Bangor Co Down Northern Ireland.

Yachtie45

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Re: Search and Rescue Helicopter positions
« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2009, 01:15:25 PM »
Hello tarbat,

regarding Air-Sea rescue and other Sea-Patrol aircraft and their usual absense of ADS-B sigs
I had a look at your screenshot given.
May I point out that far more details can be achieved by simply flatbed-scanning
a British Admiralty Chart of your area e.g.  BA115   scale 1:200 000.
By calibrating just the corner points or better plus some more intermediates you shall get a superb background.
Must not be an exact corner but any point which is easily identified by lat/long to be converted into decimal.
  I assume that the Admiralty meanwhhile has switched to multicolour charts not only in a few areas
but also or especially in your home waters.
Another source might be the IMRAY charts for Pleasure Boats, e.g. IC23 scale 1:250 000
Anyway when scanned and saved preferably as .jpg you shall have a good reference

Regards
Klaus

tarbat

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Re: Search and Rescue Helicopter positions
« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2009, 01:45:25 PM »
Unfortunately I don't have any charts.  I'm hoping that Shiptrax will have decent marine charts.

Yachtie45

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Re: Search and Rescue Helicopter positions
« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2009, 03:17:21 PM »
@ Tarbat
oh c'mon you are living at the coast, check with your local chart dealer,
even though paper charts have their price because they normally have to be revised/amended up to selling week,
you might ask for a virginlike unrevised issue for training purpose which usually sell cheaper.
Remember only what's costly is really precious, over here the IMRAY are around  € 28 and the BA at €32 each

Klaus
BTW the e-charts come only in complete areas and are much more expensive
with hundreds of @



viking9

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Re: Search and Rescue Helicopter positions
« Reply #5 on: January 31, 2009, 11:10:19 PM »
Tarbat,

Is it possible to download info from sharers with the trial version of ShipPlotter or does one have to use a VHF radio for input?

Tom
Tom
Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk UK
15 miles SE of EGUN
32 miles SE of MAM > DIKAS track
http://www.viking9.co.uk

Allocator

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Re: Search and Rescue Helicopter positions
« Reply #6 on: February 01, 2009, 08:53:22 AM »
If I remember correctly, the trial version only allows input from an AIS receiver (not a VHF receiver, it must be an AIS receiver), but access to the shared information requires registration - just like PlanePlotter.

Allocator

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Re: Search and Rescue Helicopter positions
« Reply #7 on: February 01, 2009, 09:10:44 AM »
Tarbat, are they named as SAR Aircraft as on your screen shot?  Do you have the mmsi number or callsign for any of the SAR aircraft?

tarbat

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Re: Search and Rescue Helicopter positions
« Reply #8 on: February 01, 2009, 09:37:16 AM »
Yes, the one I saw yesterday was named SAR Aircraft, MMSI was 111232501.

I only use ShipPlotter with shared data (you have to pay for that functionality), as I'm patiently waiting to see what price Shiptrax is when it's finally released.

Allocator

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Re: Search and Rescue Helicopter positions
« Reply #9 on: February 01, 2009, 09:38:59 AM »
Thanks tarbat, I hadn't thought about tracking SAR assets via AIS!

Peter

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Re: Search and Rescue Helicopter positions
« Reply #10 on: February 01, 2009, 09:57:15 AM »
I live under a regular SAR flightpath and more or less accepted that I was never going to see a plot on AirNav. I also run ShipPlotter 24/7, but have never seen anything but shipping on my screen.  I'm trawling through all the menus in case "all types" are not selected! Sunday is quite often a day when they excercise, so will be keeping my eyes and ears open!

cheers

Peter

ACW367

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Re: Search and Rescue Helicopter positions
« Reply #11 on: February 01, 2009, 09:58:30 AM »
All UK SAR aircraft use the callsign Rescue **, with the stars being numbers.  An FOI request to the MCA may give you the more detailed breakdown of number allocation or MMSI code.

http://www.mcga.gov.uk/c4mca/mcga07-home/aboutus/mcga-aboutus-foi/mcga-foia-publication.htm

It probably won't tie up to registration, but will tie it up to which SAR flight it launched from.
« Last Edit: February 01, 2009, 10:00:35 AM by ACW367 »

Yachtie45

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Re: SAR Helicopter positions
« Reply #12 on: February 01, 2009, 10:08:12 AM »
@ Allocator

The trial version of shipplotter works as well with a VHF-Receiver/Scanner with a baseband output
direct into Line In of yr PC's soundcard. Only disadvantage is one do not fetch the second AIS Channel
but that is not really a problem.
Besides Mapping the logging output is MMSI,Name/Description,ITU-Callsign,TYPE, various DIMS, and IMO
So give it a try

@ Peter
SAR-Helis show at the German Bight Coast and I remember for the Channel not only
seeing Dutch but UK SAR-Aircraft with shipplotter


Allocator

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Re: Search and Rescue Helicopter positions
« Reply #13 on: February 01, 2009, 10:30:37 AM »
Tarbat,

Your MMSI code 111232501 shows up in the search function here:

 http://www.aisliverpool.org.uk/search.php

CoastGuardJon

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Re: Search and Rescue Helicopter positions
« Reply #14 on: February 01, 2009, 11:37:24 AM »
All UK SAR aircraft use the callsign Rescue **, with the stars being numbers.

As you can guess from my handle, I'm involved with SAR as a voluntary Coastguard (aka dope on a rope!).   Most of the helio SAR in sw England is done by RN Sea Kings from 771 Squadron (grey a/c with red nose and tail with Ace of Clubs insignia).   These use the callsign Navy 193/194 etc. when on routine duties, but as soon as they've been tasked by RAF Kinloss to SAR duties, the callsign changes to Rescue 193/4 etc..   If they're tasked to a job, more than 150 miles offshore, 2 helios are always used, usually with a Nimrod providing extra cover and overseeing the op..   RAF Sea Kings out of St Mawgan (I assume they will no longer be flying out of St Mawgan now the RAF have pulled out) and Chivenor use 169 (and 170?) callsign.   The RAF SKs are fitted with FLIR equipment, but the Navy's aren't, just the No. 1 eyeball.   The Devon & Cornwall helio calls Oscar 99, and I know some other Police units also use 99 calls.

When an emergency situation arises, Falmouth/Brixham MRCC (Maritime Rescue Co-ordination Centres) have to contact Kinloss and request Navy/RAF assistance.   Officially, they cannot task Navy/RAF units directly, but a phone call is made to the bases to give them the heads up, which saves 10 minutes getting kitted up and the aircraft wound up.   The Navy and RAF usually get alerted before our pagers are pinged! and more often than not, they can get to the scene before we can (especially in the summer, with tourist drivers who are driving down the middle of the road at 20mph, rubber-necking the scenery, paying no attention - they're on holiday and leave their brains at home - rant over!).    We also work with the RNLI sea-going and inshore lifeboats, Police, Air and land Ambiulances/Paramedics etc..

Also at RNAS Culdrose (HMS Sea Hawk) there are Sea Kings used for submarine detection, Merlins, Jetstreams and around 10 Hawks, flown by ex-RAF personnel to simulate enemy aircaft and missile attacks on Navy vessels during exercises.   Very rarely is the Hawk's front seat occupied, so I'm still working on trying to bum a ride!
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